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A Mississippi lawmaker mistakenly says he wants the state to 'succeed from the Union' after Biden's election win

A Mississippi lawmaker mistakenly says he wants the state to 'succeed from the Union' after Biden's election win

Joe Biden
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks one day after the presidential election, on November 4 in Wilmington, Delaware.

  • Mississippi State Rep. Price Wallace called for Mississippi to secede from the United States after Joe Biden was named the country’s president-elect over the weekend. 
  • “We need to succeed from the union and form our own country,” he wrote in the tweet on Saturday, presumably meaning “secede.”
  • Wallace has since deleted the tweet, which marked him as one of a number of Mississippi’s leading Republicans that have backed President Donald Trump’s efforts to discredit the results of last week’s election.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A Republican lawmaker from Mississippi called for his state to “succeed” from the United States and form its own country after Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden won the election.

State Rep. Price Wallace called for the secession on Twitter, in a tweet that has since been deleted, according to the Mississippi Free Press.

“We need to succeed from the union and form our own country,” he wrote on Saturday, presumably meaning “secede.”

It’s unclear how Mississippi would go about separating from the US, or why Wallace deleted the tweet. He did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

But he is one of a number of Mississippi’s leading Republicans to back President Donald Trump’s efforts to discredit the results of last week’s election.

Mississippi’s attorney general on Monday joined a lawsuit alongside nine other Republican attorneys general in legal action to challenge Pennsylvania’s mail-in ballot extension.

“Courts don’t write the laws, they interpret them, and what the Pennsylvania Supreme Court did here was an egregious overreach that needs to be corrected so it doesn’t become precedent, Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch said in a statement to the Free Press.

Some Republican lawmakers in Mississippi, however, have applauded the historical significance of Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris’ win, and among them were state Reps. Jansen Owen and Kent McCarty.

“There’s one woman standing on stage tonight as the Vice President-elect of our United States of America,” Owen wrote on Twitter. “Regardless of one’s political ideology, this moment stands as a testament to our great nation.”

McCarty also applauded the Biden-Harris win, saying people should “regardless of party” acknowledge the “historical significance of the daughter of immigrants becoming the VP of the United States.”

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How to set up two-factor authentication on Facebook to help protect your account

How to set up two-factor authentication on Facebook to help protect your account

facebook lock BRAZIL - 2020/07/11: In this photo illustration a padlock appears next to the Facebook logo. Online data protection/breach concept. Internet privacy issues. (Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
You can set up two-factor authentication on Facebook in a few simple steps through SMS on your phone or a third-party app.

  • Two-factor authentication on Facebook adds an extra level of security to your social media account by connecting it with another device. 
  • If someone tries to sign in from an unfamiliar device, the two-factor authentication will send a unique code to either your mobile device or a third-party authentication app. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

We all know someone who has had their Facebook account hacked — probably an uncle or a grandparent. To prevent any sort of hacking taking place on your account, it is important to set up two-factor authentication

Two-factor authentication provides social media users an extra layer of security for their accounts by connecting them to different devices or applications. Facebook allows its users to set up two-factor authentication using their phone numbers or with a third-party authentication app. Here’s how to do both. 

How to set up two-factor authentication on Facebook using a mobile device

1. Open the Facebook app on your device. 

2. Select the three horizontal dots menu icon in the bottom right corner of the screen.

3. Scroll down the list and tap “Settings & Privacy.” In the dropdown menu, select “Settings.” 

FB2F1
Under "Settings & Privacy," select "Settings."

4. Under “Security,” select “Security and Login.” 

FB2F2
Tap "Security and Login."

5. Next, select “Use two-factor authentication.” 

FB2F3
Tap "Use two-factor authentication."

6. Under “Select a Security Method,” select “Text Message (SMS).” 

FB2F4
Tap on the "Text Message (SMS)" option.

7. Enter your phone number, then select “Continue.” 

8. A six-digit code will be sent to your device. Enter it in the text box and then select “Continue.” 

FB2F5
Enter the code that was texted to you and hit "Continue."

9. Two-factor authentication should now be enabled for your phone. When Facebook recognizes an unfamiliar device attempting to log into your account, it will send this code to your phone. 

How to set up two-factor authentication on Facebook using a third-party app 

1. Open the Facebook app on your device.

2. Select the three horizontal dots menu icon in the bottom right corner of the screen.

3. Select “Settings” from the list of menu options. 

4. Under “Security,” select “Security and Login.” 

5. Next, select “Use two-factor authentication.” 

6. Under “Add a Backup Method,” select “Authentication App.” Facebook will recommend a third-party authentication app if you don’t already have one installed on your device. 

FB2F6
Select "Authentication App."

7. If you already have a third-party app installed, use the QR code or copy and paste the code into your authentication app.

FB2F7
Scan the QR code, select "Set up on same device," or copy and paste the code into your authenticator app.

8. Select “Continue” and a pop-up will say that Facebook wants to open your already-installed app. Select “Open.” 

8. Enter the confirmation code in the text box and then select “Continue.” 

9. You should now be able to receive access codes from your third-party authentication app anytime you try to log into Facebook from an unfamiliar account. 

Related coverage from Tech Reference:

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Restaurants and gyms were COVID-19 superspreader sites when the pandemic began, cellphone data reveal

Restaurants and gyms were COVID-19 superspreader sites when the pandemic began, cellphone data reveal

indoor dining nyc reopen covid
A waiter delivers food to a table at Chelsea Square Restaurant as New York City restaurants open for limited capacity indoor dining on October 1, 2020 in New York.

  • Researchers mapped people’s movements based on cellphone data to study the spread of the coronavirus.
  • Restaurants, gyms, and hotels were among the riskiest spots, but reducing occupancy could help decrease the infection rate.
  • The model also accurately predicted higher infection rates in low-income neighborhoods due to greater movement to more densely packed places.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In an analysis published in Nature on Tuesday, researchers found that the majority of coronavirus infections early in the pandemic could be traced to a small portion of “points of interest,” namely restaurants, gyms, and religious establishments.

In Chicago, for instance, 10% of the places people visited accounted for 85% of predicted infections.

Identifying these “superspreader” locations can help inform reopening strategies, study co-author Jure Leskovec told Business Insider.

“The places that are the riskiest are restaurants, gyms, cafes and hotels,” said Leskovec, an associate professor of computer science at Stanford. “These are all places where people are relatively densely packed together for a long period of time.”

A study out of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted in July found people who tested positive for COVID-19 were twice as likely to have reported dining in a restaurant in the 14 days before their diagnosis than those who tested negative.

Staying home and operating at reduced capacities really does make a difference

Faced with the questions of when, where, and how to reopen businesses during the pandemic, researchers created a tool that simulates the spread of COVID-19 based on human mobility patterns.

The team, made up of scientists from Stanford University and Northwestern University, used anonymized, aggregated cellphone data to map the hourly movements of nearly 100 million people across the 10 largest US metropolitan areas between March and May 2020.

Their model can help inform future policy decisions in real time, allowing health officials to simulate the outcome of decisions to reopen at varying capacities based on empirical data rather than waiting weeks to learn the potential consequences. The researchers also published an online tool where anyone can experiment with levels of reopening in Chicago, New York, and San Francisco.

Leskovec said one of the most striking findings of their analysis was how much stay at home orders affect the spread of disease. If no one had stayed home at the beginning of the pandemic, a third of the population in the areas modeled would have been infected with COVID-19 within a month.

The size and capacity of locations, as well as how much time people spend there, affects a location’s superspreader potential.

Reopening is not an all-or-nothing thing, Leskovec said, so reducing the occupancy of a gym or restaurant can decrease potential infections. In one simulation, they found capping Chicago spots at 20% maximum occupancy cut down predicted infections by more than 80%.

The model also helps explain higher infection rates in low-income neighborhood

Although the cellphone data fed into the mobility model didn’t include details about socioeconomic status, the simulation was still able to accurately predict higher rates of infection in low-income neighborhoods compared to wealthier areas.

The model showed people living in low-income neighborhoods were less likely to stay home, which may reflect the prevalence frontline workers who could not perform their jobs remotely, the study authors wrote. Finding ways to help people stay home, like paid leave or income supports, could help close this gap.

Additionally, people from less affluent neighborhoods visited grocery stores that are typically smaller and up to 59% more crowded. Emergency food distribution centers could reduce that density in low-income settings. The authors also suggested implementing free and more widely available testing in high-risk areas.

“These findings could have a valuable role in guiding policy decisions on how to reopen society safely and minimize the harm caused by movement restrictions,” Kevin Ma and Marc Lipsitch of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health wrote in a commentary published with the study.

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