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Sequentially amplified circularly polarized ultraviolet luminescence for enantioselective photopolymerization

Sequentially amplified circularly polarized ultraviolet luminescence for enantioselective photopolymerization

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19479-1

Chiral functional materials with circularly polarized luminescence can be used in various applications but rarely reported. Here the authors show, a complex system, which show intense circularly polarized ultraviolet luminescence with large glum value, enabling a chiral UV light triggered enantioselective polymerization. Image of A lUeMWctVA

Sequentially amplified circularly polarized ultraviolet luminescence for enantioselective photopolymerization

Sequentially amplified circularly polarized ultraviolet luminescence for enantioselective photopolymerization

Nature Communications, Published online: 09 November 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19479-1

Chiral functional materials with circularly polarized luminescence can be used in various applications but rarely reported. Here the authors show, a complex system, which show intense circularly polarized ultraviolet luminescence with large glum value, enabling a chiral UV light triggered enantioselective polymerization. Image of A lUeMWctVA

Should You Put Social Media in Your Editorial Calendar?

If you are just getting started with creating and using an editorial calendar at your nonprofit, you might get overwhelmed at the prospect of including EVERYTHING in it.

Relax. Here’s some good news. Most nonprofits don’t put every social media post into their editorial calendars.

Here’s the approach we recommend instead . . .

Start with putting the bigger chunks of content on your editorial calendar. That often includes website articles and blogs, newsletters, one-off emails, direct mail, press releases, big public reports, event invitations, and the like. Start with when these things will be published, on what day and in which communications channels.

Work social media into your content repurposing workflow. Create some simple rules or patterns for how you will repurpose the content above into social media and then follow those workflows. For example, if you put three articles in your email newsletter, you might decide that you want to tweet about those three articles individually over the week following the newsletter release. It’s a good idea to document these workflows as a reminder, but you don’t necessarily have to add each and every post to an editorial calendar.

Create a thematic posting schedule. Some nonprofits organize their social media calendar around themed days. For example, they might post client stories on Tuesdays, helpful tips on Thursdays, and feel good memes on Fridays. Again, similar to the repurposing workflows, I encourage you to document your themes as a reminder to yourself and others, but you don’t necessarily have to fill them all out in your editorial calendar.

Do add social posts that absolutely MUST go out on a certain day for strategic reasons. If something big will be happening and you really must get social content out on a particular topic at a particular time of day, then in that case, I would encourage you to put it on your editorial calendar as a reminder. That way you’ll know that you need to focus on that content.

Add social posts to your editorial calendar if you are having a hard time remembering to post. Is your nonprofit still trying to build a regular habit of posting on a particular social media channel (like Instagram Stories for example)? Then it might be worth putting some of those posts on your editorial calendar as an additional nudge.

Add social posts to your editorial calendar if you have too much content and programs fighting for slots on the schedule. If your nonprofit has too much content and staff wants to post content at a pace that you feel is overkill, then it does make sense to sort that all out on an editorial calendar.

We have lots of answers to other editorial calendar questions in our Nonprofit Editorial Calendar FAQ post.

I am also teaching our Editorial Calendar Webinar Series next week on November 10 & 12, 2020.

What We Lose When We Lose Museums

What We Lose When We Lose Museums

It’s hard to overestimate the dire impact the pandemic is having on education. As clusters of COVID-19 outbreaks continue to pop up, kindergartens to graduate schools oscillate precariously between online, face to face, and hybrid instruction; administrators, educators, parents, and students struggle to plan and react.

But one important part of the education sector that hasn’t been getting much attention is the informal education that occurs outside the classroom, in museums, science and technology centers, and historic sites. These essential cultural institutions are in peril.

Consider the Computer History Museum (CHM) in Mountain View, Calif. Santa Clara County, in the heart of Silicon Valley, was admirably early in facing the pandemic, issuing its first shelter-in-place order on 16 March. With that, CHM’s doors shut to the public, and they remain so nearly eight months later. In this time, the museum has pivoted to digital and virtual offerings: online events, interpretive videos, virtual educational experiences, essays, and blogs.

The museum is fortunate in that it has a robust endowment and generous individual donors, but the fact remains that it has lost one-third of its revenue due to being physically closed. A combination of pay cuts, the Paycheck Protection Program, and fundraising appeals have helped offset the losses so far. But curators still have extremely limited access to the museum facilities, so carrying out activities intended to build the collections and make them accessible remains a real challenge.

Things are far more dire at thousands of other museums. The American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the major professional association for museum staff and volunteers in the United States, released a report in June that found one-third of U.S. museums to be at significant risk of permanent closure in the next year and a half. Let that sink in for a minute. There are 33,000 museums in the United States. The people in the best position to know think that 11,000 of them could be gone by the end of 2021.

In a statement that resonated strongly with the AAM’s findings, John Dichtl, CEO of the American Association of State and Local History, issued this eloquent statement: “Without substantial assistance, many museums, historical societies, preservation organizations, and other institutions will likely close forever. Communities across the country will be left without anchor institutions that provide context for contemporary challenges.”

Why does that matter and why should you care?

Museums are cultural institutions entangled in the lives of towns and cities. Museums have the power to transport visitors beyond their day-to-day experience. They can push you out of your bubble and into a whole new world.

For adults, they provide important opportunities for lifelong learning. Years or decades after someone has finished their formal schooling, museums are the one consistent outlet where they can find well-researched exhibits and engaging public programs.

For children, museums offer a lively learning environment outside the classroom, one that can be fully immersive and experiential. “I have always loved science museums in particular—the interactive hands-on museums.… They just exude creativity,” Kathryn Sullivan, a former astronaut and the first U.S. woman to walk in space, said in a recent interview with the Computer History Museum.

Sullivan might be a bit biased. After her NASA career, she served as director of the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus, Ohio, and held the Charles A. Lindbergh Chair at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Her career trajectory highlights the strong connection between museums and STEM education. Museums serve as powerful access points in our culture, Sullivan says, providing “engagement and understanding of nature or technology, or societal history, or natural history.”

Both of the authors of this post can also draw a line from our early museum visits to our current professions. Marsh began volunteering at the Science Museum of Virginia at the age of 14, and she went on to college internships at the Virginia Aviation Museum and the Franklin Institute.

Brock also shares a love of the Franklin Institute, especially the old mathematics gallery, and he often took his young daughters there, passing on to them a fascination with museums. The Air and Space Museum knocked his socks off when he was a kid, and he went there whenever he had the chance. Brock is now the Director of the Software History Center at the Computer History Museum; Marsh teaches history of technology and museum studies at the University of South Carolina.

Beyond their educational value, museums are also economic engines for their communities. In pre-pandemic days, museum-goers racked up more than 850 million visits to their favorite U.S. sites, which easily eclipsed the 483 million visits to all major league sporting events and amusement parks. Across the United States, museums employ more than 372,000 people directly and support an additional 325,000 jobs in the community, for roles such as exhibit design and fabrication, scriptwriting, and catering.

And yet, unlike other sectors of the economy, museums have been largely left to contend with the ongoing crisis on their own. Museums have had to share a tiny slice of the $2 trillion CARES Act funding—$200 million, or one ten-thousandth of the total—with other similarly shuttered performing arts institutions and libraries.

Do we as a society really value these vital cultural institutions, and the people who animate them, so little? How we choose to answer that question in the coming months, as the pandemic grinds on, may well determine the fate of thousands of museums across the United States.

About the Authors

David C. Brock is director of the Software History Center at the Computer History Museum. Allison Marsh is an associate professor of history at the University of South Carolina and codirector of the university’s Ann Johnson Institute for Science, Technology & Society.

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